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What is Bovine Leather and its Applications

Can the Vegans at the back close their eyes now?

 

Bovine leather is a type of leather acquired from Steers. (Steers are neutered male cattle often bred for meat). Typically, Bovine leather is any leather gotten from cattle.

 

You may open your eyes now vegans…lol

 

Bovine leather is the most prevalent type of leather as cattle is hardly a scarce commodity. This type of leather is highly regarded for its beauty, texture, resilience, and convenience. 

 

Now let’s take a broader look at Bovine leather, its benefits, and drawbacks. And most significantly for every leather aficionado, how to properly care for bovine leather.

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What is Bovine Leather and from where does it come?

As mentioned earlier in this article, Bovine leather refers to leather gotten from cattle (mostly from Sheers). Due to the availability of cattle, bovine leather is used for nearly all leather applications in the United States. The leather is acquired and processed after the animal has been slaughtered for sustenance, or has died of natural causes. 


The skins of the fallen cattle from the abattoir are stored by cowhide merchants and sold to leather manufacturing companies who proceed to process the skins with a solution of chromium salts, or vegetable tanning agents. After which the skins are reheated with the aid of highly specialized equipment. Finally, the resultant bovine oils ensure the softness and strength of the leather.

What type of leather is made from Bovine?

About 65% of all leather products in the world today are products of Bovine leather. This implies that most bags, shoes, furniture, upholstery, and other leather products are made from Bovine leather.

  • Full-Grain

Bovine leather often qualifies as Full-Grain leather due to its sheer durability. This is especially the case for acquired leather that has not been sanded, buffed, or snuffed.  This means that the original hue of full grain leather is maintained on the backsides.

  • Top Grain

Top Grain bovine leather, on the other hand, is burnished leather that has been dyed or sanded to eliminate blemishes. This means that the leather has most likely been sanded, removing some of the fibers that ensure the durability of the Full-Grain leather.

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Top-grain leather is the second-most preferred leather grade.

  • Split Bovine

Split Bovine leather is made from the epidermal’ middle and lower layers of the Sheer’s hide. Slurry and corrected-grain leathers are made with this sort of leather. They are coated with fully pigmented polyurethane

  • Finished Bovine Leather

As the name implies, finished bovine leather refers to leather with a layer that has been finished in some way. It has likely undergone a number of processes making it less durable, but more visually appealing.

  • Crust Bovine Leather

Crust bovine leather refers to bovine leather with a base layer that has been tanned but has not been finished.

What are the Uses of Bovine Leather?

Bovine leather is commonly used to make bags, wallets, coats, footwear, and clothing. Calf leather has shown to be extremely durable and resistant to scratches.

As a result of these qualities, it is utilized in manufacturing heavy-duty gloves and coats. It is also used in making shoes. One of the treasured properties of Bovine leather with shoes is its crease resistance. Even when used on a daily basis, the shoes remain intact for a long time.

Products used by the Bovine Leather

Bovine leather comes in a variety of colors and can be used for a variety of leather products, including bags and footwear. However, it can be colored in a range of stylish hues.

Bovine leather is also commonly used for shoe planks and bottoms, automobile and household covering, belts, straps, and horses. It is mostly utilized in clothing, notably jackets, in the apparel industry.

Some of the reasons for its widespread application are:

  • A large surface area
  • Durability
  • Resistance to moisture (especially Full-grain Bovine leather)

Layers Of The Bovine Leather

The bovine leather is composed of several layers. 

  1. The outermost layer is the skin, and beneath this layer is a dense layer of collagen and elastin fibers. This layer is tough and resistant to wear. 
  2. The second layer is made up of smaller bundles of collagen and elastin fibers arranged in a parallel fashion. This layer is less dense than the first but quite dense nonetheless. 
  3. The third layer contains a large number of evenly spaced small fibers spread throughout the thickness of the hide. This layer provides flexibility and elasticity to the leather.
  4. While bovine leather may be tough and long-lasting, it still needs careful cleaning with the right materials and techniques to prevent dirt and discoloration.
  5. The fourth layer is made up of shorter fibers that are more densely packed together. This makes the leather more resistant to tearing but also reduces its flexibility. 
  6. The fifth and sixth layers are very thin and composed mainly of water-soluble proteins that help keep moisture locked inside the hide.
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How to Care (Clean) Bovine Leather?

While bovine leather may be tough and long-lasting, it still needs careful cleaning with the right materials and techniques to prevent dirt and discoloration.

To clean your bovine leather, you can use a soft brush, and specialized leather cleaning agents to clean dirt marks off the surface of your Bovine leather. Alternatively, you can opt for a liquid dishwashing soap to completely remove dirt and grease if you cannot get specialized leather cleaning agents.

Remember to apply only light pressure when rubbing this immediately onto the discoloration. Wipe the liquid dishwashing soap off the leather with a moist towel. Leave it to dry naturally.

If the stain still lingers after this, lightly massage the spot with a non-acetone nail polish wipe. Then leave the leather to dry out. If this fails to get rid of your stain, you should seek expert help.

Bovine leather is generally easy to take care of. It is recognized for its resistance to dirt and water.  It is also by far one of the cheapest types of leather for most applications.

As a result of its accessibility, bovine leather is relatively inexpensive for its properties. Add that to its extreme durability and you have yourself a true competitor

Advantages of Bovine Leather

Bovine leather is generally easy to take care of. It is recognized for its resistance to dirt and water.  It is also by far one of the cheapest types of leather for most applications.

 

As a result of its accessibility, bovine leather is relatively inexpensive for its properties. Add that to its extreme durability and you have yourself a true competitor.

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Disadvantages of Bovine Leather

Over time, bovine leather can expand and reveal sagging skin. This is common with any type of leather. It’s especially noticeable on lighter-colored leather. A point to note. The more processed, finished, or burnished your bovine leather is, the lesser number of years it will last.

Bovine leather can be quite uncomfortable in summer due to its robust and hefty nature.

Lastly, one downside of bovine leather is that it is only available in a few hues. This limits your color choices for the fashionistas. However, the available hues are mostly colors that work easily with most other colors.

Conclusion

If you clicked on this article confused about what Bovine leather is, then I’m certain I have demystified Bovine leather.

Ensure to look at this guide before heading to the leather store. Feel free to share your experience with me.

FAQ’s

How to Clean Bovine Leather?

To clean your bovine leather, you can use a soft brush, and specialized leather cleaning agents to clean dirt marks off the surface of your Bovine leather. Alternatively, you can opt for a liquid dishwashing soap to completely remove dirt and grease if you cannot get specialized leather cleaning agents.

What is Bovine Leather Suede?

Bovine Leather suede is a fine bovine variant that has a fine velvet-like nap which aligns to both sides.

Which is better : Calfskin Leather vs. Bovine Leather?

It depends. Calfskin leather is more likely to be without blemishes, however, it isn’t as durable as Bowvine leather.
Bowvine leather on the other hand might have a few blemishes, but it is very durable. 
So it largely depends on the intended use of the leather.

Is Bovine Leather a Calfskin Leather?

Bowvine leather is often obtained from Sheers, and generally middle-aged cattle. Calfskin leather is often acquired from young cattle. 
Both are obtained from cattle, but one comes from older cattle, ensuring durable leather, while the other comes from younger cattle which promises fewer blemishes.

Is Bovine Leather Low-Quality Leather?

While Bovine leather is inexpensive due to the seemingly exponential availability of cattle, the leather remains a high-quality leather, and is sort after by most leather manufacturers.

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